Macroeconomic Report & Economic Updates

August 2, 2018

Nigeria Economic Update (Issue 28)

Information from the Apex bank shows a likelihood of not attaining the financial inclusion target of 2020 as stated in the Nigeria Financial Inclusion Strategy (NFIS) of 2012. Precisely, the CBN’s 2016 financial inclusion report states that only 58.4 percent of Nigerian adults were financially included as against the overall financial inclusion rate targeted at […]

Download Label
March 13, 2018 - 4:00 am
application/pdf
915.86 kB
v.1.7 (stable)
Read →

Information from the Apex bank shows a likelihood of not attaining the financial inclusion target of 2020 as stated in the Nigeria Financial Inclusion Strategy (NFIS) of 2012. Precisely, the CBN’s 2016 financial inclusion report states that only 58.4 percent of Nigerian adults were financially included as against the overall financial inclusion rate targeted at 80 percent. Similarly, only about 48.6 percent use formal financial services compared to the targeted 70 percent1. Related to the targets are 22 key performance indicators that Nigeria still lags behind in. Leveraging on technology to boost financial inclusion would be a significant step forward




Related

 

Africa Economic Update (Issue 2)

Business activities in Africa slightly improved in February 2017 albeit at a slow rate. Sales Managers Index (SMI) for Africa an assessment of business condition in Pan-African Economy increased by 0.4 index points from 52.2 points in January 2017 to 52.6 points in February 2017. Sub-Saharan African countries experienced better business activities than North Africa in the review period. The two largest economies in the region, Nigeria (48.5 index points) and South Africa (49.2 Index points) registered contraction in the review period as Nigeria remained in recession while high unemployment remained a problem in South Africa. The growth in SMI recorded in the review period is driven by improvement in business confidence and sales price which outweighed the fall in other components market growth, sales output and staffing level. 

Nigeria Economic Update (Issue 29)

OPEC weekly basket price decreased marginally from $45.95 on June 24, 2016 to $45.26 on July 1, 2016,while Nigerias bonny light fell by $1, from $48.90 to $47.91. The apparent decline in crude oil price was driven by lingering market demand uncertainty, following the unexpected Brexit referendum. More so, ease in supply disruptions in Nigeria and Canada may have contributed to the downward pressure on prices. Going forward, until there is greater regulatory precision on global oil output levels, prices may likely remain stuck or continue to exhibit a downward trend. Although, Nigerias fiscal constraints slightly relaxed with oil production increasing in the review week (following repairs on sabotaged pipeline channels), potential global crude oil oversupply threatens governments revenues. However, oversupply threats could be reduced if there is a consensus on oil production quotas in the upcoming OPEC meeting.