Policy Brief & Alerts

November 17, 2011

Program Budgeting Analysis Of Education And Health Sectors

This
brief aims to deepen stakeholders understanding of the sources of funding and
how money is allocated to and spent in the social sectors of health and
education, which are critical for pro-poor growth and poverty alleviation.

Download Label
March 13, 2018 - 4:00 am
application/pdf
67.70 kB
v.1.7 (stable)
Read →


Publication Date: March, 2012

Volume Number:1 Issue 4

Document Size: 4pages


This policy brief discusses how the public expenditure benefits the rich more thanthe poor. The full study analyses the incidence of public expenditures in the Nigerianeducation and health sectors revealing that more of children enrolled in primaryschools are from poor households. This is in contrast to public expenditure onsecondary and tertiary education which benefits richer households. Further analysisin the health sector show that the poorest households were the least likely to reportsickness and seek treatment, making them minority users of the government healthservices. The wealthiest households, however, are the main users of health facilities.Another analysis known as progressivity and targeting test, was carried out usingbenefit concentration curves for both sectors. The results show that Nigerias in-kindsubsidy is poorly targeted.




Related

 

Nigeria Economic Update (Issue 20)

Power sector analysis shows an increase in power generated by 15.5 percent from 3639.2 megawatt to a peak of 4196.2 megawatt between April 22, 2016 and April 29, 201612, albeit a sharp fall to 25.2 megawatts on April 23, 2016 following a system collapse13. In a bid to attain the targeted 10,000 megawatts by 2019, the Federal Government is set to complete the ongoing 47 power transmission projects across the country, which would boost power supply14. However, the delays in passing the budget into law is a major constraint to the completion of the projects. Thus government needs to speed-up the passage of the 2016 budget to provide the funds to complete the projects.

Africa Economic Update (Issue 3)

Available data shows that headline inflation rates increased and remained high in most countries in the region in February 2017. Specifically, inflation rate increased in Egypt (30.2), Burundi (20.9 percent), Kenya (10.28), and Ethiopia (8.5 percent), while it eased in Nigeria (17.78 percent), Ghana (13.2 percent), South Africa (6.3 percent), and Namibia (7.8 percent). Seychelles (-0.6 percent) remained in deflation while Sudan (32.86 percent) and Tunisia (4.6 percent) had unchanged inflation rates within the review period. Increased cost of food continued to plague the region as food component of inflation remained the major driver of inflation. Drought in East Africa continues to compound price pressure in the region. Inflation rates in Burundi6, Kenya and Ethiopia increased by 8, 3.29, and 2.4 percentage points respectively, signifying the three highest price increase in the review period

Enhancing Oil Sector Governance In Nigeria Through Transparency Reforms

The paper highlights the importance of oil sector transparency in order to support governments push towards structural reforms and inclusive growth.