March 23, 2021

Improving energy efficiency and interconnectivity in Africa through regional economic integration

Affordable and efficient energy supply is essential for enhanced welfare and better development outcomes. However, African states suffer from huge deficits in energy generation and distribution, resulting in unreliable power networks, frequent power outages and expensive tariffs. In a bid to improve efficiencies through interconnectivity and reduce energy development challenges at the national level, sub-regional power pooling initiatives have become increasingly popular in Africa. The idea behind creating power pools is to encourage cooperation among countries, through linking excess capacity in one country where power is produced more economically, with excess demand in another country that can benefit from cheaper imports.

Download Paper here

Download Label
March 13, 2018 - 4:00 am
application/pdf
587.57 kB
v.1.7 (stable)



Related

 

Understanding The Ongoing Recession In Nigeria:A Synthesis Of The Events And Policy Options

In the second quarter of 2016, the Nigerian economy witnessed its first recession in twenty years due to the interplay of several external and internal factors. The recession has continued until date and has given rise to relentless unemployment rate and job losses, double digit and soaring inflation, currency depreciation and widening gap between parallel market and official exchange rates, amongst other adverse effect on individuals and firms in the country. Thus, there is a need to take a deeper look into the nature of the present recession as well as the impact of monetary and fiscal policy responses thus far, in order to shed light on the way forward towards tackling the recession and ensuring sustainable economic growth. This paper analyses the ongoing recession in the Nigerian economy to provide insights into the interplay of events and recommendations for policy.

The Chinese Model Of Infrastructure Development In Africa

Infrastructural development is a key step in providing a competitive business environment for African economies. It provides the backbone for poverty reduction strategies and programmes designed to improve the livelihood of the poor. Africa is in dire need of infrastructural development. The absence of quality infrastructure in the continent holds back per capita economic growth by 2 percentage points each year and depresses firm productivity by as much as 40 percent (Escribano et al., 2008 and Kelly, 2012). Estimates suggest that around USD 90 billion is required to close Africas infrastructure gap annually until 2020 (AICD, 2010).