Macroeconomic Report & Economic Updates

January 13, 2017

Nigeria Economic Update (Issue 1)

The
external reserve increased week-on-week by 2 percent to $26.3 billion on
January 6, 2017. The increase was likely triggered by continued
marginal rise in crude oil price, which moderated oil revenue in the review
week. The recent rise in crude oil price is likely to be maintained in the
short term given the recent oil production cut deal by OPEC members. Thus, the Nigerian
government should target short term increase in crude oil production to fully
take advantage of Nigerias exemption from oil production cut and potential
rise in oil prices.

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Nigeria Economic Update (Issue 21)

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Nigeria Economic Update (Issue 47)

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