September 23, 2019

Is Nigeria on track to achieving quality education for all? Drivers and implications

Quality education is a key enabler for sustainable growth and development. The 2030 Agenda rightly recognises this with SDG 4. Despite the importance accorded to education, Nigeria’s educational performance is abysmally low in terms of quality and quantity. Poor educational outcomes are illustrated by the existence of more than 10.5 million out-of-school children in 2018, which is the highest number globally (Adekunle, 2018). On the quality side, educational performance is even more worrisome. According to the World Economic Forum (2017), Nigeria ranks 124th out of 137 countries in terms of the quality of primary education.

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