September 23, 2019

Summary Report: Is Nigeria on track to achieving quality education for all?

Quality education is a key enabler for sustainable growth and development. The 2030 Agenda rightly recognises this with SDG 4. Despite the importance accorded to education, Nigeria’s educational performance is abysmally low in terms of quality and quantity. Poor educational outcomes are illustrated by the existence of more than 10.5 million out-of-school children in 2018, which is the highest number globally (Adekunle, 2018). On the quality side, educational performance is even more worrisome. According to the World Economic Forum (2017), Nigeria ranks 124th out of 137 countries in terms of the quality of primary education.

About the SVSS project
The Southern Voice “State of the SDGs” initiative provides evidence-based analysis and recommendations to improve the delivery of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). As a collaborative initiative, the program compiles a broad range of perspectives that are usually missing from international debates. This report aims to fill an existing knowledge gap. Southern Voice is confident that it will enrich the discussions on the SDGs and level the playfield with new voices from the Global South.
This piece was first published here: Southern Voice
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