Policy Brief & Alerts

November 12, 2012

Cost Effectiveness Analysis Of Selected Malaria Interventions In Nigeria

This brief highlights the findings of
a cost effectiveness analysis conducted on two malaria intervention programs
implemented in Jigawa State, Nigeria under the National Malaria Control
Programme: the long-lasting insecticide treated nets intervention and the indoor
residual spraying program.

Download Label
March 13, 2018 - 4:00 am
application/pdf
60.45 kB
v.1.7 (stable)
Read →

Recent statistics show that Nigeria ranks among the top five countries in termsof malaria incidence and deaths in the world. Reports indicate that 100 percentof the population is at risk of contracting malaria. At present, there are about4,295,686 confirmed cases of malaria in Nigeria. In 2009, the number of deathsattributed to malaria was estimated at 7,522. In the same year, 658,732 out of1,115,966 hospital admissions were attributed to malaria, out of the 7,296reported malaria deaths in children 4, 126 of these deaths were in childrenunder the age of five. This trend together with and its possible economic andfiscal impact, has made it imperative for the Nigerian government to fundmalaria interventions. Recently, Nigeria, with some financial support fromdonors, implemented the Indoor Residual Spraying (IRS) and the Long LastingInsecticidal Nets (LLINs) programs.

This brief summarizes the findings of a cost effectiveness analysis conducted onlong-lasting insecticide treated nets and indoor residual spraying interventionsimplemented in Jigawa State under the National Malaria Control Programme(NMCP).




Related

 

Nigeria Economic Update (Issue 52)

Recently released population estimate figures by the Nigeria Bureau of Statistics, show a significant increase in Nigerias population, based on the 2006 census. Notably, total population grew by an estimated 40 percent from 2006, to 193 million persons in 2016. Also, disaggregate demographic data from 2007 to 2016, reveals an increase in the number of males (74 million to 99 million) and females (71 million to 95 million), with a 2016 gender (males to females) percentage ratio of 51:49. The high rate of population growth can be attributed to the improvements in average annual rate of natural increase the difference between crude birth rate and death rate. As in preceding years, the composition of children and youths make up the highest share of the population growth. This presents a potential increase in the rate of labour supply. Going forward, there is need for the government to support rapid job creation in order to check the potential upsurge in unemployment rate.