Macroeconomic Report & Economic Updates

March 9, 2018

Nigeria Economic Update (Issue 13)

Recent media highlights suggests that the Federal Government made a non-oil-based revenue of N1.27 trillion from operating surpluses between 2007 and 20161. The period which covers the years of operation of the Fiscal Responsibility Act, shows a list of agencies and government organizations that paid the operating surpluses (revenues above approved budgetary expenditure at the […]

Download Label
March 13, 2018 - 4:00 am
application/pdf
901.23 kB
v.1.7 (stable)
Read →

Recent media highlights suggests that the Federal Government made a non-oil-based revenue of N1.27 trillion from operating surpluses between 2007 and 20161. The period which covers the years of operation of the Fiscal Responsibility Act, shows a list of agencies and government organizations that paid the operating surpluses (revenues above approved budgetary expenditure at the end of each year) to the federal government.  Notably, the annual remittances shows year-on-year increases. This is likely attributable to the improved monitoring and intervention activities of the Fiscal Responsibility Committee over the years. There is greater scope for operating surpluses from public corporations with intensified efforts at monitoring the implementation of the template for calculating operating surplus liabilities across scheduled corporations.




Related

 

Nigeria Economic Update (Issue 49)

Nigerias Petroleum Products Imports statistics show a gradual reduction in the volume and value of petroleum imports (PMS, AGO, HHK) between May and September 2016. Specifically, volume of imports declined by 34.1 percent for PMS, 37.6 percent for AGO, and 60.3 percent for HHK in the period.The significant decline in imports in the reporting periods may be as a result of persistent forex scarcity issues faced by importers. On account of stagnation in domestic production of refined petroleum products, continuous decline in oil imports may create a demand gap with upward pressure on gasoline prices in the economy.

Africa Economic Update (Issue 6)

Available data shows that headline inflation reduced in most countries in the region in May 2017 relative to preceding months. Notably, headline inflation decreased in Nigeria (16.25 percent), Ghana (12.26 percent), Tanzania (6.1 percent), Senegal (1.8 percent), Namibia (6.3 percent) and Rwanda (11.7 percent), while it grew in South Africa (5.4 percent), Kenya (11.7 percent), Ethiopia (8.7 percent) and Uganda (7.2 percent). Cote dIvoire (-0.4 percent) recorded consumer price deflation. The decrease in consumer price in Nigeria, Tanzania and Ghana can be attributed to decreases in both food and non-food components of inflation. Regionally, all countries in Southern Africa recorded single digits inflation, however consumer price marginally increased in South Africa, for the first time in 2017 owing to spike in food prices6, and Botswana (both by 0.1 percent).

Multidimensional Impact Evaluation:

Ending (extreme) poverty in all of its forms everywhere around the world continues to dominate the International Development Agenda (UN 2015). However, while poverty is declining in much of the developing world, data from the World Development Report (WDR) Conflict, Security, and Development reveal that fragile and conflict-affected states are lagging behind. The report points out that 'Poverty rates are 20 percentage points higher in countries affected by repeated cycles of violence over the last three decades. Indeed, with the worlds extreme poor over represented in fragile and conflict-affected ,some authors argue that violent conflict is development in reverse