Bi-weekly Seminars

August 26, 2013

Political Decentralisation And Natural Resource Governance In Nigeria

The paper discusses Natural Resource
Control and how it is affected by governance in Nigeria with focus on two
oil-producing states. It also examines sub-national accountability in the use
of natural resource revenues.

Download Label
March 13, 2018 - 4:00 am
application/pdf
777.80 kB
v.1.7 (stable)
Read →

Background

  • Nigeria is a federal country with a tripartite administrative structure national govt. + 36 states + 774 local governments, each of which has constitutionally defined functions
  • Since 1999, political decentralisation has given subnational governments greater autonomy over their fiscal affairs
  • Low public accountability very little is known about how subnational governments are using their oil revenues.
  • In the resource-rich Niger Delta, this contradiction between power and unaccountability is most extreme
  • Oil producing states receive 13% monthly oil revenue derivation payments for territorial oil production, in addition to constitutionally entitled revenues
  • This has quadrupled the size of state budgets and expenditures

Problem:

  • Academic and policy scholarship tends to focus more on centralised than decentralised political corruption in Nigeria
  • Poverty and corruption cannot be addressed without improved sub-national accountability in the use of natural resource revenues




Related

 

Should Nigeria Establish A Sovereign Wealth Fund?

This paper explores the issues relating to the establishment of a Sovereign WealthFund (SWF) in Nigeria consistent with best practices. Experience with established SWFssuggests that successful oil- based funds tend to be underpinned by a sound oil revenuemanagement framework. The paper thus discusses the underlying issues of oil revenuemanagement, the policy choices and SWF implementation issues.

Increasing Female School Enrollment In Nigeria: Some Policy Options

This brief examines two policy alternatives which government can adopt in order to increase the enrollment of girls in the primary school and also help eliminate gender disparity in Nigerian schools: Provide free primary education with Stipends or provide free primary education with Transportation.

Nigeria Economic Review

Global economic growth remained fairly stable in 2016Q3 with baseline projections for global growth at 3.1 percent and 2.4 percent by International Monetary Fund (IMF) and the World Bank respectively. Growth in developed countries was moderate but unevenly distributed: while the U.S and the UK showed improvements, growth in other economies remained tepid. Among emerging countries, India witnessed higher growth while growth in China remained constant but the Chinese Yuan continued to appreciate. Given that India is Nigerias major crude oil importer, improving economic conditions in India may translate into rising demand for Nigerias crude oil. However, the continuous appreciation of the Yuan poses significant inflationary threat in Nigeria given the high level of imports from China. Subdued global demand, weak trade, uncertainties in commodity prices and consequences of the Brexit were the key constraining factors to growth over the period. In addition, growth in Sub-Saharan African countries remained generally slow on the account of low commodity price, political turmoil, and inconsistent government policies.