Macroeconomic Report & Economic Updates

August 14, 2018

Nigeria Economic Update (Issue 29)

The IMF retained its 2.1 percent forecast of Nigeria’s GDP growth rate for 2018, while increasing the 2019 projected GDP growth rate to 2.3 percent1, from 1.9 percent projected earlier. The stated review is at the backdrop of continued increases in commodity prices in the long term, for which crude oil is the benchmark for […]

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The IMF retained its 2.1 percent forecast of Nigeria’s GDP growth rate for 2018, while increasing the 2019 projected GDP growth rate to 2.3 percent1, from 1.9 percent projected earlier. The stated review is at the backdrop of continued increases in commodity prices in the long term, for which crude oil is the benchmark for Nigeria. Outlook on crude oil price and production is expected to maintain upward improvements in the near term. However, the Nigerian government pegs its own forecasted growth rate at 3.5 percent in 2018 – higher than figures predicted by the IMF, although premised around the same driving factors. In order to achieve a 3.5 percent GDP growth rate, a more effective implementation of the bold initiatives in this administration’s economic plan – the Economic Recovery and Growth Plan – is critical particularly in the agriculture and manufacturing sectors.




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Balance Of Trade (Export And Import)

Balance of Trade (Export and Import): With export and, to lesser extent, import declining balance of trade fell deeply in 2015 and, to lesser extent, in 2016Q1.

Nigeria Economic Update (Issue 23)

Recent Data on Nigerias Real GDP growth rate (Year-on-Year) declined by 2.47 percentage points, from 2.11 per cent in 2015Q4 to -0.36 percent in 2016Q11. This is the lowest GDP growth rate since 2004Q2 (-0.81 percent). The Oil sector continued to contract, as -1.89 percent growth was recorded in 2016Q1. The negative growth witnessed in the oil sector was likely driven by the fall in global oil prices by $9.732 and decline in domestic crude oil production, relative to preceding quarter. Similarly, the Non-oil sector witnessed a negative growth as it declined by 3.32 percentage points from 3.14 percent in 2015 Q4 to -0.18 percent in 2016Q1. The underperformance in the non-oil sector was driven by significant contractions in financial (by 17.69 percent), manufacturing (by 8.77 percent), and real estate (by 5.48 percent) sub-sectors. Given that the present economic fundamentals point to a likely recession in 2016Q2, the government can stir economic activities by speeding up the budget implementation process to spur growth in the non-oil sector and the economy at large. More so, the domestic production shock in the oil sector needs to be addressed to effectively leverage on the present marginal rise in crude oil prices.