Macroeconomic Report & Economic Updates

August 2, 2018

Nigeria Economic Update (Issue 28)

Information from the Apex bank shows a likelihood of not attaining the financial inclusion target of 2020 as stated in the Nigeria Financial Inclusion Strategy (NFIS) of 2012. Precisely, the CBN’s 2016 financial inclusion report states that only 58.4 percent of Nigerian adults were financially included as against the overall financial inclusion rate targeted at […]

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Information from the Apex bank shows a likelihood of not attaining the financial inclusion target of 2020 as stated in the Nigeria Financial Inclusion Strategy (NFIS) of 2012. Precisely, the CBN’s 2016 financial inclusion report states that only 58.4 percent of Nigerian adults were financially included as against the overall financial inclusion rate targeted at 80 percent. Similarly, only about 48.6 percent use formal financial services compared to the targeted 70 percent1. Related to the targets are 22 key performance indicators that Nigeria still lags behind in. Leveraging on technology to boost financial inclusion would be a significant step forward




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Consequences Of School Resources For Educational Achievement

This paper examines the determinants of educational achievement in a developing country context, Burkina Faso. We deviate from the extant literature by constructing an aggregate index of school quality from the observable school resources. Also, we account for school choice constraints, faced by children especially in rural areas, as it relates to the geographical inequalities in the distribution of quality schools. These treatments provide an unbiased estimates of the relevance of school resources for academic performance. The empirical approach is based on a two-stage procedure that accounts for supply constraints in school choice.

Nigeria Economic Update (Issue 2)

International rating body, Fitch, has projected higher economic growth for Nigeria in 2018. The body estimated that Nigerias economy will grow by 2.6 percent, slightly higher compared to projections from the International Monetary Fund (2.1 percent) and The World Bank (1 percent). A myriad of factors may have driven the projected increase: improved availability of forex for the non-oil sector, higher government capital expenditure capability driven by more oil revenue, and fiscal stimulus. However, the relatively strong economic growth projected by Fitch and IMF may be hampered