Macroeconomic Report & Economic Updates

March 9, 2018

Nigeria Economic Update (Issue 12)

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According to data released by the National Bureau of Statistics, states generated about N931.2 billion altogether in 2017 fiscal year1, representing 12 percent above the N831.2 billion generated in 2016. Further breakdown shows that 31 states recorded increases, while only about 5 states recorded slight declines in revenue generated internally; Lagos state generated 36 percent of total internally generated revenue (IGR). Notably, with a net FAAC allocation of N1.7 trillion, total revenue available to states stood at approximately N2.7 trillion in 2017. However, the states are still burdened with debts, given the N3.2 trillion and $4.1 billion owed as domestic and foreign debts respectively as at the end of December 2017. Going forward, improvements in tax collection and administrative capacities of revenue-generating agencies of other states, beyond Lagos, can further improve overall IGR.




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Nigeria Economic Update (Issue 19)

A recent report by the National Bureau of Statistics (NBS) indicates that Internally Generated Revenue (IGR) at the subnational level decreased slightly between 2014 and 2015. Specifically, the report shows that on the average, the IGR of all 36 states declined by 3.6 per cent from N707.9 billion in 2014 to N683.6 billion in 20157. A further disaggregation reveals that while IGR in 11 states improved in 2015 compared to 2014, IGR in 24 states were below their 2014 levels. As expected, Lagos state generated the most IGR during the period. Given that domestic resource mobilization is the most viable alternative to complement the shortfalls (driven by lower oil prices) in budgetary allocations to states from the federal government, state governments need to do more to improve the effectiveness and efficiency of revenue collection.

Nigeria Economic Update (Issue 50)

Crude oil price experienced a mixed week from November 18 to November 25, 2016. Specifically, OPEC basket price and Brent crude price fluctuated, to a daily average of $44.6 (from $42.33)and $48.3 (from $46.86)per barrel respectively. The present oil volatility is as a result of sell-offs, attributable to speculations/fears of an insufficient production cut by OPEC (in its bid to control oversupply) - a deal scheduled for its next meeting on November 30th 2016. This speculations have arisen due to the reluctance of major OPEC member country (Saudi Arabia) to participate in the potential oil cut dealwhich could exert a downward pressure on oil prices. However, oil prices should rise if OPEC members agree to the oil cut deal. Irrespective of the outcome of the meeting, Nigeria is exempted from the potential crude oil cut. Thus, it will be optimal for the government to act quickly to address the insurgence in the Niger Delta region, in order to raise domestic oil production as much as possible.

Nigeria Economic Update (Issue 43)

Crude oil prices have sustained upward increases for the past few weeks in October. While upward trajectory of crude oil prices is expected to be sustained in the short term in line with OPECs production cuts deal expected to run until March 2018, it is important to note that crude oil prices would remain volatile. The Nigerian government therefore should take advantage of periods of high revenue from crude oil exports to develop other sectors (such as Agriculture, Manufacturing and Services sectors) of the economy as key exporting and revenue generation sectors, and thus minimize volatility risks