Macroeconomic Report & Economic Updates

September 4, 2018

Nigeria Economic Update (Issue 34)

Total capital imported into Nigeria declined in 2018Q2, compared to 2018Q1 – the first quarterly decline since 2017Q1. At $5.5 billion in 2018Q21, capital importation dropped by 12.5 percent from the $6.3 billion recorded in the preceding quarter. The quarter-over-quarter decline may be attributable to decreases in both portfolio and other investments, which fell by […]

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Total capital imported into Nigeria declined in 2018Q2, compared to 2018Q1 – the first quarterly decline since 2017Q1. At $5.5 billion in 2018Q21, capital importation dropped by 12.5 percent from the $6.3 billion recorded in the preceding quarter. The quarter-over-quarter decline may be attributable to decreases in both portfolio and other investments, which fell by 9.8 percent and 24.1 percent respectively. However, portfolio investment maintained its leading role in contributing to total capital importation, at $4.1 billion or 74.5 percent. On the flip side, FDI continues to be the least contributor since 2017Q1, and accounted for only 4.7 percent ($264.1 million) in the review quarter. The overall lower capital inflows, particularly portfolio investments, puts into perspective the recent persistent downward trend in Nigeria’s capital and money markets.




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Nigeria Economic Update (Issue 20)

The Naira maintained slight appreciation against the dollar in the review week. At the parallel market, the value of the Naira appreciated week-on-week by 1.6 percent to exchange at N380/$ on May 19, 2017. In addition, inter-bank market rate appreciated slightly by 15kobo to N305.45/$. The appreciation in both segments of the market are favorable effects of the CBNs continued forex supply in the week under review (In a bid to further ease forex liquidity, the CBN pumped a total of $457.3 million on May 15, 2017).

Understanding The Ongoing Recession In Nigeria:A Synthesis Of The Events And Policy Options

In the second quarter of 2016, the Nigerian economy witnessed its first recession in twenty years due to the interplay of several external and internal factors. The recession has continued until date and has given rise to relentless unemployment rate and job losses, double digit and soaring inflation, currency depreciation and widening gap between parallel market and official exchange rates, amongst other adverse effect on individuals and firms in the country. Thus, there is a need to take a deeper look into the nature of the present recession as well as the impact of monetary and fiscal policy responses thus far, in order to shed light on the way forward towards tackling the recession and ensuring sustainable economic growth. This paper analyses the ongoing recession in the Nigerian economy to provide insights into the interplay of events and recommendations for policy.