August 17, 2020

Nigeria Economic Update (Issue 30)

Microsoft Word – Harvard help sheet The Nigerian Investment Promotion Commission (NIPC) reported a 67 percent decline in investment in H1 2020, compared to H1 2019. The decline saw investment fall to US$5.06 billion compared to US$15.15 billion in the preceding year2. Top destination sectors include Transportation & Storage (39%) as well as Information & Communication (32%) sectors. However, the overall weak economic activity in top donor countries like United States of America (USA), which account for 43 percent of inflows contributed to the decline. Understandably, the lockdown measures and low oil price have slowed existing investment prospects and caused multinational enterprises to reassess new projects which will affect development. Going forward, investment is likely to continue to decline given that these conditions are unlikely to give way until the pandemic ends. Nevertheless, the NIPC should use the pandemic as an opportunity to promote investment in traditional and new opportunity areas including health, food and agriculture, and tech-related sectors. Furthermore, the NIPC should develop an online one-stop shop for investors in the absence of inter-country travel.

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Nigeria Economic Update (Issue 18)

Recent Data released by the Nigeria Bureau of Statistics reveals an increase in total public debt stock between 2015 and 2016. Foreign and domestic debt stock stood at $11.4 billion and N14.0 trillion respectively as at December 2016, from $10.7 billion and N10.5 trillionrecorded as at December 2015. Disaggregated data shows that foreign debt sources comprised Multilateral ($8.0 billion), Bilateral ($0.2 billion) and Exim bank of China ($3.2 billion); domestic sources included government bonds, treasury bills and bonds. The federal government and states accounted for 68.7% and 31.3% respectively of foreign debt stock; 78.9% and 21.1% respectively of domestic debt stock. This maybe particularly at the backdrop of government borrowings in 2016 to finance its expenditure (mostly recurrent).

Nigeria Economic Update (Issue 3)

Recently released inflation rate report by the NBS shows a further decline in consumer price index in December 2017. At 15.37 percent, the CPI was 0.53 percentage points lower than the 15.90 percent recorded in November 2017. The food sub-index decreased to 19.42 percent from 20.21 percent, indicating reduced pressure on food prices in the review period. Core sub-index fell slightly to 12.1 percent from 12.21 percent in the preceding month. Going forward, the ability of the Central Bank of Nigeria (CBN) to control inflation in 2018 may be hampered by monetary injections by the government and politicians towards budgetary expenditure and election campaigns, respectively.