Publications

June 26, 2017

Institutions And Sustainable Industrial-led Development In Sub-Saharan Africa

In 2015, economic growth in Sub-Saharan Africa
(SSA) slowed to 3.4 percent from 4.6 percent the previous year. The economic
slowdown in the region was the result of an interplay of several external and
domestic factors such as lower commodity prices, slowdown in the economies of
major trading partners, tightening borrowing conditions, political instability
and conflict, electricity shortages and other infrastructure deficiencies (World Bank, 2016). This sluggish
growth trends is in contrast to the impressive growth recorded in the region,
over the past decade.

Download Label
March 13, 2018 - 4:00 am
application/pdf
779.00 kB
v.1.7 (stable)

Related

 

Nigeria Economic Update (Issue 35)

Recent report in the media highlights that Nigerias GDP has dropped to $296 billion in 2016, in contrast to the $481 billion recorded in 20151 and Nigeria has lost its position as Africas largest economy to South Africa. This conclusion was based on the computation of GDP with current naira-dollar exchange rate. However, while the naira has significantly lost its official value since the adoption of a flexible exchange rate, estimating GDP merely with a single exchange rate figure (rather than its yearly average) cannot be regarded as an appropriate method to conclude on Africas largest economy.

Net Foreign Exchange Flows Through The Nigerian Economy

Net Foreign Exchange Flows through the Nigerian Economy: The recent fall in foreign exchange earnings reflects the decline in both oil sector receipts from CBN, and non-oil sector inflows from autonom