Publications

November 15, 2013

Employment Choice And Mobility In Multisector Labor Markets

This paper examines employment choice and occupational
mobility using data from Ghana in a model that
incorporates capital market failure, credit constrained individuals and draw
self-employment capital from family asset.

Download Label
March 13, 2018 - 4:00 am
application/pdf
775.70 kB
v.1.7 (stable)
Read →

Author:Olumide Taiwo

Publication Date: November, 2012

Keywords: Employment Choice; Mobility; Multisectoral Labor Markets; Self Employment

JEL Classifications: J01, J21, J24, N37, O12, O17


This paper examines employment choice and occupational mobility using data from Ghana. In amodel that incorporates capital market failure, credit constrained individuals draw selfemploymentcapital from family asset. The empirical findings validate the predictions of thetheoretical model. The data shows very low rates of mobility across sectors and that workers infamily enterprise are the most mobile while self-employed workers are the least mobile. I findno robust evidence that wage earnings ease liquidity constraints. The findings suggest that bothliquidity and skill transferability constraints are important for mobility.




Related

 

Nigeria Economic Update (Issue 19)

Internally generated revenue by 35 states for the 2016 fiscal year increased by 17.5 percent to N802 billion from N683 billion generated in the preceding year. A breakdown of the IGR shows that the increase was driven by PAYE, Direct assessment, Road taxes, Revenue from MDAs and other taxes. The highest and lowest revenue generating states were Lagos (38%) and Ebonyi (0.1%) respectively. An improvement in the efficiency of the tax system could improve the contributions of the IGR to overall government revenue. Particularly, incorporating workers in small stores, agricultural and informal businesses into the tax system; building capacity of tax officials and computerizing their operations; as well as investing in quality data collection and access could provide some quick wins.

Institutions And Sustainable Industrial-led Development In Sub-Saharan Africa

In 2015, economic growth in Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) slowed to 3.4 percent from 4.6 percent the previous year. The economic slowdown in the region was the result of an interplay of several external and domestic factors such as lower commodity prices, slowdown in the economies of major trading partners, tightening borrowing conditions, political instability and conflict, electricity shortages and other infrastructure deficiencies (World Bank, 2016). This sluggish growth trends is in contrast to the impressive growth recorded in the region, over the past decade.

Nigeria Economic Update (Issue 20)

Power sector analysis shows an increase in power generated by 15.5 percent from 3639.2 megawatt to a peak of 4196.2 megawatt between April 22, 2016 and April 29, 201612, albeit a sharp fall to 25.2 megawatts on April 23, 2016 following a system collapse13. In a bid to attain the targeted 10,000 megawatts by 2019, the Federal Government is set to complete the ongoing 47 power transmission projects across the country, which would boost power supply14. However, the delays in passing the budget into law is a major constraint to the completion of the projects. Thus government needs to speed-up the passage of the 2016 budget to provide the funds to complete the projects.

Nigeria Economic Update (Issue 39)

The monthly monetary survey by the CBN shows a decline in money supply for the month of August 2017, relative to July 2017. Narrow and broad money supply dropped by 4.2% and 1.5% to N9,891 billion and N21,851 billion respectively. The continuous monetary contraction witnessed over the past months may be associated with aggressive sale of treasury bills by the CBN through open market operations. This act is capable of mopping up liquidity in the economy, reduce loanable funds in the banking system, and constrain the easing of lending rates in the near term.