Project Reports

June 14, 2012

Program Based Budgeting Analysis Of Education, Health And Water Sectors In Nigeria

This report examines the Federal Government spending in the three (3) main social sectors of the Nigerian economy – Education, Health and Water, in five (5) distinctive categories over a period of four (4) years. Rather than reviewing the budget for these three sectors in the format in which they are presented in the federal […]

Download Label
March 13, 2018 - 4:00 am
application/pdf
540.78 kB
v.1.7 (stable)
Read →

This report examines the Federal Government spending in the three (3) main social sectors of the Nigerian economy – Education, Health and Water, in five (5) distinctive categories over a period of four (4) years. Rather than reviewing the budget for these three sectors in the format in which they are presented in the federal Governments budget, the report arranged the data according to major programs (following program budgeting approach). It analyzes the Federal Governments budget appropriation and implementation, revealing the performance of government expenditure in these sectors. The report also compares the federal government spending in terms of recurrent versus capital expenditures; wage versus non-wage expenditures and donor versus domestic expenditures.

This analysis shows that the Nigerian government apportioned more funds to the education sector and least to the water sector between the years 2006 to 2010 with the total sums of N1,125 billion and N224 billion (in 2006 prices), respectively. Compared with other countries, spending on education, health and water in percent of GDP is still low; social indicators are poor and the allocation within sectors is not consistent with national priorities MDGs and vision 20:2020.




Related

 

Nigeria Economic Update (Issue 5)

All Share Index (ASI) and Market Capitalization declined by 13 percent to close at 23514.04 points and N8.09 trillion respectively at the end of the trade session on January 15. The huge drop in the Index, representing a 3-year low, led to the introduction of the Index Circuit Breakers Rule. While this policy measure may prevent huge losses in the stock market, rising concerns about macroeconomic stability in Nigeria may significantly increase the level of volatility in the stock market. This may have substantial adverse implications for investors in the Stock Exchange.