Macroeconomic Report & Economic Updates

July 30, 2018

Nigeria Economic Update (Issue 25)

The recent report on Nigeria’s Public Debt Stock for the first quarter of 2018 indicates a 4.5 percent Quarter-over-Quarter increase, from N21.7 trillion in Q4 2017 to N22.7 trillion1, and a Year-on-Year increase of 18.5 percent from N19.2 trillion2. The ratio of domestic debt to external debt is put at 70:30, a reduction in domestic […]

Download Label
March 13, 2018 - 4:00 am
application/pdf
975.71 kB
v.1.7 (stable)
Read →

The recent report on Nigeria’s Public Debt Stock for the first quarter of 2018 indicates a 4.5 percent Quarter-over-Quarter increase, from N21.7 trillion in Q4 2017 to N22.7 trillion1, and a Year-on-Year increase of 18.5 percent from N19.2 trillion2. The ratio of domestic debt to external debt is put at 70:30, a reduction in domestic debt from the previous share of 73 percent, and an increase of external debt share from 27 percent – a reflection of the need for caution in external borrowings




Related

 

Nigeria Economic Update (Issue 50)

Crude oil price experienced a mixed week from November 18 to November 25, 2016. Specifically, OPEC basket price and Brent crude price fluctuated, to a daily average of $44.6 (from $42.33)and $48.3 (from $46.86)per barrel respectively. The present oil volatility is as a result of sell-offs, attributable to speculations/fears of an insufficient production cut by OPEC (in its bid to control oversupply) - a deal scheduled for its next meeting on November 30th 2016. This speculations have arisen due to the reluctance of major OPEC member country (Saudi Arabia) to participate in the potential oil cut dealwhich could exert a downward pressure on oil prices. However, oil prices should rise if OPEC members agree to the oil cut deal. Irrespective of the outcome of the meeting, Nigeria is exempted from the potential crude oil cut. Thus, it will be optimal for the government to act quickly to address the insurgence in the Niger Delta region, in order to raise domestic oil production as much as possible.

Africa Economic Update (Issue 6)

Available data shows that headline inflation reduced in most countries in the region in May 2017 relative to preceding months. Notably, headline inflation decreased in Nigeria (16.25 percent), Ghana (12.26 percent), Tanzania (6.1 percent), Senegal (1.8 percent), Namibia (6.3 percent) and Rwanda (11.7 percent), while it grew in South Africa (5.4 percent), Kenya (11.7 percent), Ethiopia (8.7 percent) and Uganda (7.2 percent). Cote dIvoire (-0.4 percent) recorded consumer price deflation. The decrease in consumer price in Nigeria, Tanzania and Ghana can be attributed to decreases in both food and non-food components of inflation. Regionally, all countries in Southern Africa recorded single digits inflation, however consumer price marginally increased in South Africa, for the first time in 2017 owing to spike in food prices6, and Botswana (both by 0.1 percent).