Macroeconomic Report & Economic Updates

July 4, 2017

Nigeria Economic Update (Issue 23)

Recently released report by the NBS shows an increase in Unemployment and Underemployment rates for 2016Q4 relative to preceding and corresponding quarters. The unemployment rate, at 14.2 percent, indicates a 3.8% points YoY4increase, and a 0.3% points QoQ increase with the number of unemployed people increasing by 351,051 persons. Similarly, underemployment rate grew (QoQ) by 1.3% points to 21%, representing about 17 million underemployed persons as at the quarter. The rise in unemployment/underemployment rate is attributable to the disproportionate rise in labour force vis–vis job creation, in addition to slow-down in economic/business activities during the quarter. Going forward, the government should make efforts to strengthen and expand Nigerias entrepreneurial infrastructure.

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Nigeria Economic Update (Issue 43)

The IMF World Economic Outlook report, indicates a downward revision for Nigerias 2017 economic growth. Specifically, growth has been projected to expand by 0.6 percent relative to the 1.1 percent earlier projected. The decrease is attributable to sharp growth slowdown experienced in Nigeria, occasioned by prevailing constraining factors (crude oil production disruptions, Forex and power shortages, and weak investor confidence). The outlook, which does not seem optimistic, reveals Nigerias further vulnerability to potential external and internal risks/shocks.

Nigeria Economic Update (Issue 18)

Recent Data released by the Nigeria Bureau of Statistics reveals an increase in total public debt stock between 2015 and 2016. Foreign and domestic debt stock stood at $11.4 billion and N14.0 trillion respectively as at December 2016, from $10.7 billion and N10.5 trillionrecorded as at December 2015. Disaggregated data shows that foreign debt sources comprised Multilateral ($8.0 billion), Bilateral ($0.2 billion) and Exim bank of China ($3.2 billion); domestic sources included government bonds, treasury bills and bonds. The federal government and states accounted for 68.7% and 31.3% respectively of foreign debt stock; 78.9% and 21.1% respectively of domestic debt stock. This maybe particularly at the backdrop of government borrowings in 2016 to finance its expenditure (mostly recurrent).