Macroeconomic Report & Economic Updates

March 9, 2018

Nigeria Economic Update (Issue 12)

According to data released by the National Bureau of Statistics, states generated about N931.2 billion altogether in 2017 fiscal year1, representing 12 percent above the N831.2 billion generated in 2016. Further breakdown shows that 31 states recorded increases, while only about 5 states recorded slight declines in revenue generated internally; Lagos state generated 36 percent […]

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According to data released by the National Bureau of Statistics, states generated about N931.2 billion altogether in 2017 fiscal year1, representing 12 percent above the N831.2 billion generated in 2016. Further breakdown shows that 31 states recorded increases, while only about 5 states recorded slight declines in revenue generated internally; Lagos state generated 36 percent of total internally generated revenue (IGR). Notably, with a net FAAC allocation of N1.7 trillion, total revenue available to states stood at approximately N2.7 trillion in 2017. However, the states are still burdened with debts, given the N3.2 trillion and $4.1 billion owed as domestic and foreign debts respectively as at the end of December 2017. Going forward, improvements in tax collection and administrative capacities of revenue-generating agencies of other states, beyond Lagos, can further improve overall IGR.




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Nigeria Economic Update (Issue 43)

Crude oil prices have sustained upward increases for the past few weeks in October. While upward trajectory of crude oil prices is expected to be sustained in the short term in line with OPECs production cuts deal expected to run until March 2018, it is important to note that crude oil prices would remain volatile. The Nigerian government therefore should take advantage of periods of high revenue from crude oil exports to develop other sectors (such as Agriculture, Manufacturing and Services sectors) of the economy as key exporting and revenue generation sectors, and thus minimize volatility risks

Nigeria Economic Update (Issue 15)

Nigerian Naira depreciated by 1.2 percent at the parallel foreign exchange market between April 7, 2017 and April 14, 2017. The naira exchanged at N410/$ as against N405/$ the previous week. Despite the CBNs weekly dollar sales to BDCs ($20,000 to each BDC in the review week) and spot market sales of $100 million to SMEs, the nairas depreciated in the week. This may likely be attributable to speculative motives (on the basis that speculators likely anticipate that the CBN forex interventions may not be sustainable).

Nigeria Economic Update (Issue 1)

Nigerias external reserves improved in 2017. The reserve stood at approximately $39 billion as at the end of December 2017, up by about 50 percent from the $26 billion at the beginning of the year 20172. The surge in reserve was particularly boosted by increased capital importation, and crude revenue earnings prompted by a relatively higher crude oil price and improved domestic production. Given that the recent uptick in external reserves is still largely associated with improved crude oil price, efforts should be geared towards conserving current reserve gain so as to cushion future external shock. In the medium term, there is need to diversify export earning away from oil so as to mitigate the effects of volatility in crude oil prices.