Project Reports

September 15, 2017

MANUFACTURING SECTOR: Operating Admist Economic Recession And Rising Foreign Exchange Rates

This 2017 Manufacturing Sector survey provides an assessment of the
Nigerian manufacturing sector, highlighting
the key challenges facing operators within
the sector. It also examines the dynamics and
major development in the manufacturing
sector over the last one year. Overall, the
objective of the report is to provide a snapshot
of the manufacturing sector in Nigeria,
which will provide a framework for policy
intervention by policymakers

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