May 14, 2020

COVID-19: Risk-Control Measures Threaten To Deepen Nigeria’s Education Crisis

The past few weeks have ushered in a range of government-sanctioned and structure-shifting risk-control directives across Nigeria and the Globe, in an attempt to curtail the spread of the novel coronavirus disease- COVID-19. From international airport closures, to a nationwide closure of all schools, and now, a two-week lockdown of three major states – Lagos, Abuja and Ogun, the ramifications from the slowdown/shutdown of economic activity are poised to be severe for Nigeria. It is especially critical, because in the backdrop of COVID-19, the global economic crisis and the recent slump in oil prices are further expected to intensify the impending economic crises, and create sharp shocks that will reshape the economy in the near term. 

For some sectors, the immediate ramifications are evident. One of such sector is the basic education sector, the impact of which has been largely felt by students. The nationwide school closures have disrupted learning and access to vital school-provided services for a record number of students in Nigeria. According to UNESCO, almost 40 million learners have been affected by the nationwide school closures in Nigeria, of which over 91 percent are primary and secondary school learners. In a short time, COVID-19 has disrupted the landscape of learning in Nigeria by limiting how students can access learning across the country.

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Nigeria Economic Update (Issue 47)

Recent data by NBS indicates an increase in bank credit to private sector. Specifically, private sector credit rose (year on year) by 24.4 percent to N16,185.1 billion in 2016Q3 relative to 2016Q2, with Oil and gas, and Manufacturing sectors taking the consecutive largest shares of the credit. The rise may be connected to the need to improve credit availability to critical sectors in order to hasten the recovery from the ongoing recession. The present rise in bank credit to the manufacturing sector seems to be a step in the right direction as the sector is critical to Nigerias industrialization and economic stability.