January 20, 2021

Building Businesses Back Better amid COVID-19 Pandemic in Africa

This research analyses the effects of COVID-19 pandemic on micro, small and medium business activities, and its implications for how to be better prepared for possible future socioeconomic shocks, and the geopolitical repercussion for African governments.

This article was first published as a Visiting Scholars’ Opinion Paper for the Korea Institute for International Economic Policy (KIEP)

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