June 18, 2013

Achieving Inclusive Growth Through Pro-poor Spending

The
paper examines if the nature of the economic growth in Nigeria is inclusive
(Pro-poor) or exclusive (pro-rich) and recommends ways to achieve inclusive
growth with emphasis on Pro-poor spending.

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Author:Ibrahim A. Tajudeen

Publication Date: December, 2011

Document Size:18pages


Objectives

  • This study aims to achieve the following objectives;
  • Determine whether Nigeria is experiencing economic growth.
  • Determine the nature of the growth in Nigeria inclusive (Pro-poor) or exclusive (pro-rich)?
  • Recommend ways to achieve inclusive growth or to sustain existing inclusive growth emphasize Pro-poor spending.

Concepts

Inclusive Growth

    • growth that enables the poor to actively participate in and significantly benefit from economic activities.
    • growth that reduces the level of poverty by providing everyone the minimum basic capabilities
    • Labour absorbing, mitigate inequalities, facilitate income and employment generation for the poor, particularly women (ADB,1999)

Pro Poor Spending

    • reduces the level of poverty, inequality and empowers females.
    • focuses on the development of key social and




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