June 18, 2013

A Cost-Effectiveness Analysis Of School Feeding And Education Assistance Programs In Nigeria

The study conducts a cost-effectiveness analysis on two education interventions
in Nigeria: Education Assistance program and the Home Grown School
Feeding and Health Program with the aim of increasing school enrollment.

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Author:Dr. Ebere Uneze

Publication Date: December, 2012

Document Size:20pages


Key Message

Knowledge about the concept andapplication of cost-effectiveness analysiscan help policymakers make informedchoices about programs that can improvethe lives of the citizens

Introduction

  • Increasing access to basic education is a priority for policymakers
  • Low school enrollment is a big problem in Nigeria, especially inthe North, and stands in the way of the Education for All (EfA)program and educationMDG
  • Enrollment can be increased using several interventions, but forthis analysis, we focus on: EA and HGSF&H




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