Policy Brief & Alerts

November 11, 2011

Transparency Deficits In The Disclosure Of Oil Sector Information In Nigeria

This brief examines the challenges in the discharge of
statutory transparency roles by strategic regulatory institutions in the oil
sector and also identifies policy interventions to improve access to
information on key oil sector processes and transactions.

Download Label
March 13, 2018 - 4:00 am
application/pdf
3.64 MB
v.1.7 (stable)
Read →

Publication Date:November, 2011

Volume Number: 1

Document Size: 4pages


This Policy Brief presents the findings of the Transparency Building Initiative, aproject of the Facility for Oil Sector Transparency (FOSTER) in Nigeria,implemented by CSEA. FOSTER is a five-year DFID funded project that aims toimprove oil sector transparency in Nigeria through a combination of technicalanalysis and policy advocacy. CSEA is the local partner in the FOSTER consortium,working with Oxford Policy Management, UK, and the Revenue Watch Institute,USA.

The Transparency Building Initiative (TBI) identified the most significanttransparency deficits in the disclosure of information on the Nigerian oil sector.This exercise was informed by the 2010 ranking of Nigerias oil sector by theinternationally reputed Revenue Watch Index as having partial revenuetransparency. In response to this global rating of oil sector transparency inNigeria, the TBI project sought to identify weaknesses in the discharge ofstatutory transparency roles by strategic regulatory institutions in the oil sector,specifically in the disclosure of information and data. The project also identifiedpolicy interventions to improve access to information on key oil sector processesand transactions.




Related

 

Nigeria Economic Update (Issue 51)

Recently released data by the National Bureau of Statistics (NBS) shows that there was significant increase in Nigerias total merchandise trade for 2016Q3. Basically, the total merchandise trade increased (quarter-on-quarter) by 16.29 percent to N4, 722 billion in 2016Q3;owing to 29.1 percent increase in exports and 6.2 percent rise in imports. Oil exports increased by 31 percent to N1, 943 billion, while non-oil exports increased by 20.5 percent to N440 billion. However, on the aggregate, Nigeria recorded yet another trade deficit of N104 billion, indicating continuous higher imports relative to exports. Overall, though there is improvement in the performance of non-oil sector, however, this is insufficient to effectively complement the loss in oil trade sustained since the beginning of oil price crash. This suggests that diversification into non-oil sector may not be able to rescue the economy in the short term. However, while the diversification efforts should be sustained, eliminating hurdles in oil production may be instrumental to higher exports, especially as oil price increase is gaining momentum.

Nigeria-Poland Bilateral Trade: Identifying New Trade Opportunities

This paper examines the bilateral trade relationship between Nigeria andPoland for the period 1995 to 2012. It uses the Decision Support Model (DSM)and the Growth Identification and Facilitation Framework (GIFF) to identifymarket for Nigerian exports in Poland.