January 22, 2016

Trade And Foreign Direct Investment Nexus In West Africa: Does Export Category Matter?

This paper examines the effect of inward FDI in
West Africa on exports to EU countries. It investigates from a host country
perspective, the impact of FDI on different export categories: primary,
intermediate, and final goods.

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Trade and Foreign Direct Investments are the key
divers of economic integration and the globalization process. The widely held
view is that both trade and FDI are beneficial, as the former can stimulate
innovation, productivity, competitiveness, and diversification; and the latter
increases the capital stock, provides new job opportunities, and promotes the
transfer of technology. Thus there have been profound calls within
international organizations for developing countries to encourage both trade
and FDI in order achieve robust economic growth and development. However, critics argue that trade, particularly imports, can
create undue competition and stifle indigenous manufacturing; and inward FDI
can also displace domestic firms. Similarly, from a source country perspective,
outward FDI can lead to loss of jobs as multinationals move job opportunities



Infrastructure Financing In Nigeria:

Similar to most sub-Saharan African (SSA) countries, Nigeria has a huge infrastructure deficit which considerably limits efforts towards achieving inclusive growth, sustainable development, and poverty reduction. With infrastructure stock estimated at 20-25 per cent of Gross Domestic Product (GDP), Nigerias infrastructure stock is still significantly lower than the recommended international benchmark of 70 per cent of GDP. The 2014 National Integrated Infrastructure Master Plan (NIMP) estimates that a total of US$ 3 trillion of investments, or US$100 billion annually, is required over the next 30 years to bridge Nigerias infrastructure gap. In particular, the Plan estimates that Nigeria will have to spend an annual average of US$ 33 billion infrastructure investments for the period 2014 -2018. This means that Nigeria will have to more than double its spending on infrastructure from the current 2-3 per cent of GDP to around 7 per cent to make appreciable progress in infrastructure development over the next three decades.

Nigeria Economic Update (Issue 4)

Recently released labour force report by the NBS shows a quarter-over-quarter increase in Nigerias working age and labour force population. Working population rose from 110.29 million in 2017Q2, to 111.13 million persons in 2017Q32. The working age population in 2017Q3 constituted 85.08 million persons in the labour force (an increase from 83.94 million), of which 40 percent were either unemployed or underemployed.  Thus, total employed persons in the quarter reached 69.1 million.

FDI, FPI And Other Investments

FDI, FPI and other Investments: Portfolio investment has continued to fall rapidly since 2014, while FDI inflows remain subdued since 2010

Nigeria Economic Update (Issue 42)

Recently released survey report by the CBN shows an improvement in the availability of secured and unsecured banks credit and loans to households, corporate and small businesses in 2017Q3, and an optimistic outlook in 2017Q4. Among other indices, availability of overall secured and unsecured lending to households improved from -6.2 and -19.2 to -0.9 and -15.0 index points respectively; although still in the negative territory. Index for availability of credit to small businesses improved from -20.1 to -6.7. Lenders and respondents noted that anticipation of a brighter economic outlook, favorable liquidity positions, market share objectives and higher appetite for risk were major factors behind the increase.