Publications

January 22, 2016

Trade And Foreign Direct Investment Nexus In West Africa: Does Export Category Matter?

This paper examines the effect of inward FDI in
West Africa on exports to EU countries. It investigates from a host country
perspective, the impact of FDI on different export categories: primary,
intermediate, and final goods.

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Trade and Foreign Direct Investments are the key
divers of economic integration and the globalization process. The widely held
view is that both trade and FDI are beneficial, as the former can stimulate
innovation, productivity, competitiveness, and diversification; and the latter
increases the capital stock, provides new job opportunities, and promotes the
transfer of technology. Thus there have been profound calls within
international organizations for developing countries to encourage both trade
and FDI in order achieve robust economic growth and development. However, critics argue that trade, particularly imports, can
create undue competition and stifle indigenous manufacturing; and inward FDI
can also displace domestic firms. Similarly, from a source country perspective,
outward FDI can lead to loss of jobs as multinationals move job opportunities
overseas




Related

 

Extra-ECOWAS Trade And Investment Flows: Any Evidence Of Business Cycles Transmission

This study investigates the effects of merchandise trade and investment flows on the transmission of business cycles between members of ECOWAS and the major trading partnersbetween 1985 and 2014. Total trade and FDI significantly influence the transmission of business cycles with elasticities of 1.1% and 0.7%, respectively in the long run. There are little variations across the major trading partners and other measures of trade flows. Intra-industry trade flows with all partners, EU and USA influences the cross-country business cycles with elasticities of 1.0%, 0.5% and 1.8%, respectively. 

Nigeria Economic Update (Issue 2)

Inflation rate rose slightly to 9.4 percent in November 2015 from 9.3 percent in the previous month. This rise is attributed to price increase in Food and Non-Alcoholic Beverages, and Transportation costs which extends from shortages of petrol across the country. The food sub-index grew by 0.2 percentage points to 10. 1 percent while, the Core sub-index declined by 0.2 percentage points to 8.7 percent within the period. The inflationary up-tick points to the need to curtail the rising food prices by increasing the supply of petrol in the country.