Publications

April 27, 2011

Testing The Impact Of Foreign Aid And Aid Uncertainty On Private Investment In West Africa

The paper examines the impact
of foreign aid on private investment in West Africa and whether multilateral and
bilateral aid affects private investment differently.

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Author:Eberechukwu Uneze

Publication Date:September, 2010

JEL Classification: E22; F35; C33

Key words: Foreign Aid; Investment; Fixed Effects

Document Size: 24 pages


Drawing on the vast literature on aid allocation this paper examines whether foreign aid has anyimpact on private investment in West Africa when other determinants of private investment aretaken into account. Following from this, the paper investigates whether multilateral aid andbilateral aid affect private investment differently. In a related analysis the paper examines theimpact of aid uncertainty on private investment. The results show that multilateral aid affectsprivate investment positively, but not bilateral aid, and uncertainty, measured as the coefficientof variation has a negative impact on private investment and therefore reduces the impact of aidon domestic private investment.




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