Policy Brief & Alerts

January 25, 2019

Simulation of the Effect of Tax Increase

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In June 2018, Nigeria introduced a new tax regime on tobacco products. In addition to the present 20% ad valorem excise duty charged on locally produced goods, tobacco products will now attract a specific duty of ₦20 per pack, which will rise to ₦40 and ₦58 in 2019 and 2020 respectively. Given government’s decision to adopt tobacco taxation as part of broader tobacco control measures, we examine the potential impacts of this new policy as well as other recommended changes in the tobacco tax levels.




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