Bi-weekly Seminars

June 18, 2013

Public Debt In A Growing Economy And Implications For The Nigerian Case

The
paper analyses the impact of public debt on an economy using Nigeria as case
study and identifies steady states in the model of a closed economy.

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Author:Prof. Dr. Dr. h.c. H.-Dieter Wenzel

Document Size:31pages


Main Source of Presentation

Wenzel, H.-Dieter (2001). Growth Equilibria with Public Debt. Society and Economy in Central and Eastern Europe. Journal of the Budapest University of Economic Sciences and Public Administration. Bd.(Vol.) 23/1-2 S. 70-88. Budapest .

Wenzel, H.-Dieter (2006). Public Finance (ffentliche Finanzen). Unpublished German Script from Bamberg University, Bamberg.




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