Project Reports

July 23, 2012

Policy Simulation Of Measles Immunization Programs For Children In Borno State

This
study conducts a policy simulation exercise on two measles immunization
programs for children of age 9-23 months to determine the effectiveness and
success of measles vaccination coverage in Borno State, Northern Nigeria.

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Despite the efforts made by the Nigerian government, policy makers and other stakeholder to increase children vaccination against infections, measles vaccination coverage remains veryl ow. While this problem is more profound in the northern part of Nigeria, its present form in Borno State even requires urgent attention. This study is an attempt to expose the issue. It conducts a policy simulation exercise on two measles immunization programs for children of age 9-23 months free immunization against measles with media awareness campaign (PolicyA) and free immunization against measles with house to house campaign (Policy B) to boost children measles immunization coverage. The study estimates the relative cost and the effectiveness measure such as the health benefits morbidity avoided and mortality averted. In what follows, it compares the cost per child covered and the cost-effectiveness ratios of the policy alternatives. The cost per child indicates that policy A has a lower cost and lower level of coverage, while policy B has a higher cost and a higher level of immunization coverage. In terms of cost of treating measles and the value of statistical life (VSL), the results of the cost effectiveness analysis show that both policies are efficient. However, policy A has a lower cost effectiveness ratio than policy B.

 




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