Macroeconomic Report & Economic Updates

February 21, 2018

Nigeria Economic Update (Issue 8)

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Global benchmark crude, Brent, sold for $66.43 per barrel, a little above 3.4 percent from the $64. 3 per barrel in the preceding week. Nigeria’s Bonny light exchanged for $65.71 per barrel. Global Crude supply levels have been constrained by a dip in Libya’s production, following the shutdown of the El Feel oilfield in Libya, which produces 70,000 bpd. This is complemented by the continued compliance by OPEC member countries to curb production levels, thus rebalancing the global crude oil market and gradually driving prices upwards.

 




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Nigeria Economic Update (Issue 41)

The naira continued its downward trajectory in the review week. Specifically, naira depreciated significantly at the parallel segment by 3.5 percent to a record low of N440/$ on September 23, 2016. Notably, this was driven by the worsening liquidity constraints at the interbank market which left the excess forex demand to be sourced at the parallel market, and thus exerted downward pressure on the naira. The naira is likely to further weaken given that most of the liquidity constraints are exogenously determined and thus forex supply will likely remain subdued by its demand.

Consequences Of School Resources For Educational Achievement

This paper examines the determinants of educational achievement in a developing country context, Burkina Faso. We deviate from the extant literature by constructing an aggregate index of school quality from the observable school resources. Also, we account for school choice constraints, faced by children especially in rural areas, as it relates to the geographical inequalities in the distribution of quality schools. These treatments provide an unbiased estimates of the relevance of school resources for academic performance. The empirical approach is based on a two-stage procedure that accounts for supply constraints in school choice.

Nigeria Economic Update (Issue 9)

The naira depreciated by 8.2 percent from N305/$ on February 5th, to N330/ $ on February 12th 20166. The apex body identified the increased domestic demand for forex to pay for foreign medical treatments and schools fees (15 percent of total demand) 7 as the main drivers. As a result, the apex bank is considering to discontinue the provision of forex for payment of medical bills and school fees abroad and to re-channel the forex towards the manufacturing sector of the economy. With the continuous depreciation of the naira, and the CBNs resistance from calls to devalue the currency, the options for alternatives measures seem to be diminishing.