Macroeconomic Report & Economic Updates

February 21, 2018

Nigeria Economic Update (Issue 8)

Global benchmark crude, Brent, sold for $66.43 per barrel, a little above 3.4 percent from the $64. 3 per barrel in the preceding week. Nigeria’s Bonny light exchanged for $65.71 per barrel. Global Crude supply levels have been constrained by a dip in Libya’s production, following the shutdown of the El Feel oilfield in Libya, which […]

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Global benchmark crude, Brent, sold for $66.43 per barrel, a little above 3.4 percent from the $64. 3 per barrel in the preceding week. Nigeria’s Bonny light exchanged for $65.71 per barrel. Global Crude supply levels have been constrained by a dip in Libya’s production, following the shutdown of the El Feel oilfield in Libya, which produces 70,000 bpd. This is complemented by the continued compliance by OPEC member countries to curb production levels, thus rebalancing the global crude oil market and gradually driving prices upwards.

 




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Nigeria Economic Update (Issue 29)

Global oil price edged upwards in the review week. International crude benchmark, Brent, rose week-on-week by 3.1 percent to $50 per barrel as at July 21, 20173 a level it had not attained since June. The remarkable gains followed demand-side progress earlier statistics from China showed increase in crude imports, indicating prospects of higher demand. This was also complimented by the huge drop in US domestic crude production (Crude reserves fell by 4.7 million barrels). If the trend is sustained, Nigeria could record further rise in its Gross Federally Collected Revenue. Nevertheless, there remains a need for Nigeria to overcome the challenge of harnessing its oil and gas resources by making strategic policy choices andensuring coordination in policy implementation to minimize macroeconomic distortions.

Nigeria Economic Update (Issue 1)

GDP growth rate increased marginally by 2.84 percent in Q3 2015 from 2.35 percent in the preceding quarter. Nominal GDP increased to N24.3 million from N22.9 million in the preceding quarter. Growth in this period was attributed to the improved performance of the non-oil sector which grew by 3.05 percent. The Sectoral disaggregation shows that the Services and Agricultural sectors grew by 3.97 and 3.46 percent respectively, while the Manufacturing sector shrank by 1.75 percent.

Nigeria Economic Update (Issue 8)

Recent data from the National Bureau of Statistics (NBS) show that total capital importation in 2015 fell steeply by 53.5 per cent from $20,750.76 million in 2014 to $9,643.01 million in 20152. This decline was largely driven by a substantial drop in portfolio investment (the largest component of Capital Inflows), which fell by 59.74 percent. The exclusion of Nigeria from the JP Morgan EM Bond index, the slump in crude oil prices, the decision of the US Federal Reserve to raise interest rates and the capital control measures imposed by the Central Bank of Nigeria (CBN) are the notable drivers of the reduced inflow of capital. Going forward, improving the business environment, especially easing foreign exchange controls, would determine the extent to which the economy can attract increased capital inflows.