Macroeconomic Report & Economic Updates

March 1, 2019

Nigeria Economic Update (Issue 6)

Download Label
March 13, 2018 - 4:00 am
application/pdf
314.45 kB
v.1.7 (stable)
Read →

The Nigerian economy raked in more revenue for the four quarters of 2018 fiscal year than in 2017. In the recently released economic report, the CBN reported that federally collected revenue increased by 28.4 percent to N9.44 trillion in 20181 – from N7.35 trillion in 20172. Both oil and non-oil components of federally collected revenue rose in the review year, attaining one-year peaks in 2018Q4 (N1.47 trillion) and 2018Q3(N1.14 trillion) respectively. The annual increase was most prominent in oil revenue sources, which grew significantly by 35 percent at the backdrop of 2018 improved oil price and domestic production, and accounted for N5.55 trillion of the total collected revenue. However, after statutory deductions and transfers, the federal government retained N3.96 trillion and a closer review shows that the FG expenditure pattern – at N7.36 trillion – resulted in a fiscal deficit of N3.4 trillion for the whole year 2018. Boosting non-oil sector trade and export, through infrastructure development and credit support, is critical to boosting overall government revenues to levels that match expenditure.




Related

 

Nigeria Economic Update (Issue 20)

The Naira maintained slight appreciation against the dollar in the review week. At the parallel market, the value of the Naira appreciated week-on-week by 1.6 percent to exchange at N380/$ on May 19, 2017. In addition, inter-bank market rate appreciated slightly by 15kobo to N305.45/$. The appreciation in both segments of the market are favorable effects of the CBNs continued forex supply in the week under review (In a bid to further ease forex liquidity, the CBN pumped a total of $457.3 million on May 15, 2017).

Export Commodity Prices And Long-Run Growth Of Primary Commodities-Based African Economies

There is a link between primary commodity export prices and economic performance. Many African economies are primary commodities export biased, often in few primary commodities. Previous studies focus on the impact of commodity prices on growth in Africa with little attention paid to different primary commodities and level of diversification in primary commodities export. This study, investigates the effect of primary commodity prices on the long-run growth of 24 primary commodities-based African economies; by commodity types and level of diversification in primary commodities exports.

The Chinese Model Of Infrastructure Development In Africa

Infrastructural development is a key step in providing a competitive business environment for African economies. It provides the backbone for poverty reduction strategies and programmes designed to improve the livelihood of the poor. Africa is in dire need of infrastructural development. The absence of quality infrastructure in the continent holds back per capita economic growth by 2 percentage points each year and depresses firm productivity by as much as 40 percent (Escribano et al., 2008 and Kelly, 2012). Estimates suggest that around USD 90 billion is required to close Africas infrastructure gap annually until 2020 (AICD, 2010).

Nigeria Economic Update (Issue 7)

Recent domestic Crude oil statistics from the Nigerian National Petroleum Corporation (NNPC), reveals an increase in total crude oil export sales in December 2016. Relative to November 2016, total export sales of crude oil rose from $166.18 million to $195.40 million in December 2016 representing 17.6 percentage (Month-on-Month) increase. The increase is attributable to a rise in crude oil production following a drastic (Year-on-Year) reduction in pipeline vandalism in the preceding month. Given that improvement in oil revenue is critical to fiscal sustainability and external balance, intensified efforts should be implemented towards the maintenance and sustainability of peace in the Niger Delta Region.