Macroeconomic Report & Economic Updates

March 1, 2019

Nigeria Economic Update (Issue 6)

The Nigerian economy raked in more revenue for the four quarters of 2018 fiscal year than in 2017. In the recently released economic report, the CBN reported that federally collected revenue increased by 28.4 percent to N9.44 trillion in 20181 – from N7.35 trillion in 20172. Both oil and non-oil components of federally collected revenue […]

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The Nigerian economy raked in more revenue for the four quarters of 2018 fiscal year than in 2017. In the recently released economic report, the CBN reported that federally collected revenue increased by 28.4 percent to N9.44 trillion in 20181 – from N7.35 trillion in 20172. Both oil and non-oil components of federally collected revenue rose in the review year, attaining one-year peaks in 2018Q4 (N1.47 trillion) and 2018Q3(N1.14 trillion) respectively. The annual increase was most prominent in oil revenue sources, which grew significantly by 35 percent at the backdrop of 2018 improved oil price and domestic production, and accounted for N5.55 trillion of the total collected revenue. However, after statutory deductions and transfers, the federal government retained N3.96 trillion and a closer review shows that the FG expenditure pattern – at N7.36 trillion – resulted in a fiscal deficit of N3.4 trillion for the whole year 2018. Boosting non-oil sector trade and export, through infrastructure development and credit support, is critical to boosting overall government revenues to levels that match expenditure.




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Nigeria Economic Update (Issue 10)

Nigerias inflation rate remained above CBNs bandwidth of 6-9 per cent. Specifically, the inflation rate increased slightly from 9.55 percent in December 2015 to 9.62 percent in January 20165. The Core sub-index remains the main driver of inflation in Nigeria. The higher prices of items in the Core sub-index such as clothing and foot wears are reflective of higher domestic production costs as a result of the decline in the value of the naira relative to the dollar. However, in the period, the price increase was moderated by the stable price of Premium Motor Spirit (PMS). Going forward, without any sustainable policy measure to prevent the further depreciation of the naira, inflation may exceed the current single digit inflation rate in the near term.

Africa Economic Update (Issue 7)

The International Monetary Fund (IMF) slightly revised upward growth projections for SubSaharan Africa by 0.1 percentage point in 2017 but retained growth estimates for 2018.1 Precisely, growth estimate in the region was increased from 2.6 percent in April 2017 forecast to 2.7 percent in July 2017 forecast, while it was retained at 3.5 percent for 2018. The slight upward revision in 2017 is attributable to an upgrade in South Africas growth prospect from 0.8 percent in April 2017 to 1.0 percent in July 2017. Despite the upward 2017 revision, 2018 forecast for South Africa was revised down from 1.6 percent in April 2017 to 1.2 percent in July 2017. Growth forecast for Nigeria remained unchanged at 0.8 percent and 1.9 percent for 2017 and 2018 respectively.