Macroeconomic Report & Economic Updates

March 10, 2018

Nigeria Economic Update (Issue 6)

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The federal government fiscal operations in 2017 shows that there were deficits for the four quarters recorded. The CBN report reveals that the federal government spent a total of N147.11 billion on capital expenditure in the four quarters (including a 2016 fiscal year roll-over due todelay in approving the 2017 budget), and N3.64 trillion as recurrent expenditure in 2017. Capital releases suggest that only about 6.6 percent of budgetary amount of N2.24 trillion was spent in the fiscal year, while recurrent expenditure represented 72 percent of N5.06 trillion budgeted
for the year. Nigeria’s recurrent expenditure has always exceeded capital expenditure for infrastructure, however, the delay in the passage of the 2017 budget (in June 2017) may have triggered the slow-down in capital releases. Nonetheless, the 2017 budget is still being followed, given that the 2018 budget has not been passed. Going forward, the process of the 2018 budget release should be expedited, as delay in budget sends negative signals to foreign investors which could make them divert capital investment to other countries.




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Nigeria Economic Update (Issue 28)

Latest monthly economic report by the CBN reveals a decline in foreign exchange flows through the CBN. Foreign exchange inflow through the apex bank, dropped Month-on-Month by 21 percent to $2.3 billion in May 2017, occasioned by the fall in from Oil and Non-oil sources during the month.

Africa Economic Update (Issue 4)

International Monetary Fund (IMF) revised down growth forecast for Sub-Saharan Africa by 0.2 percentage points, while retaining growth estimates for Nigeria and South Africa in 2017. Precisely, growth rate forecast for Africa was reduced from 2.8 percent in January 2017 forecast to 2.6 percent in April 2017 forecast while growth estimates were retained at 0.8 percent for both South Africa and Nigeria. In contrast, global economic growth outlook was increased by 0.4 percentage points from 3.1 percent to 3.5 percent within the same period. Growth in Sub-Saharan Africa is hampered by adverse cyclical and supply side factors, weak fiscal buffers and rising public debt amongst non-commodity exporters as well as severe drought was experienced in Eastern and Southern Africa

Regional Integration In Africa: Some Recent Developments And Challenges

African countries have been left out of the recent benefits accruing from international trade. For example, they accounted for only 3.2 percent of world trade in 2013 compared to 5 percent in the mid-1960s. Regional integration can reverse this weak performance as it holds the promise for countries to gain from the resultant economies of scale and enhanced competitiveness. It will also help to expand the markets for foreign direct investment.

Issues In Fiscal Policy Management Under The Economic Reforms

This paper was produced as part of a larger project which was jointly financed by the UKDepartment for International Development in Nigeria (through its Policy and Knowledge facility)and the Research Committee of the World Bank.