Macroeconomic Report & Economic Updates

January 15, 2018

Nigeria Economic Update (Issue 51)

According to figures released by the Nigeria Bureau of Statistics, employment growth lagged during the recession period, and worsened unemployment/underemployment rates few quarters after. Specifically, unemployment rate rose to 18.8 percent in 2017Q31, up from 16.2 percent in previous quarter (the recession-exit quarter) and 13.9 percent in corresponding quarter. Disaggregated figures reveal that the number of unemployed and underemployed persons in the labour force increased by 17 percent and 2 percent respectively, to 15.9 million and 18.0 million in 2017Q3, majority of which are young persons within ages 15-34. 

Download Label
March 13, 2018 - 4:00 am
application/pdf
527.77 kB
v.1.7 (stable)

Related

 

Budget 2013 And The Drive Towards Inclusive Economic Growth

This brief examines Nigerias Budget 2013, entitled Budget of Fiscal Consolidation with Inclusive Growth and highlights key sectoral allocations of the budget and their targets.

Nigeria Economic Update (Issue 42)

The NSE market indices recorded a bear market rally for the third consecutive week in September. Specifically, All-share index and Market Capitalization increased marginally by 0.31 percent to close at 28,335.40 points and N9.73 trillion respectively on September 30, 2016. Major drivers of the rally include; increased trade-volume of financial, agricultural and consumer-goods securities. The continued rise in market indices may be connected to a sustained investor confidence in the agricultural and financial sectors on the account of the ongoing activities of the government and the CBN to stabilize the sectors.

The Chinese Model Of Infrastructure Development In Africa

Infrastructural development is a key step in providing a competitive business environment for African economies. It provides the backbone for poverty reduction strategies and programmes designed to improve the livelihood of the poor. Africa is in dire need of infrastructural development. The absence of quality infrastructure in the continent holds back per capita economic growth by 2 percentage points each year and depresses firm productivity by as much as 40 percent (Escribano et al., 2008 and Kelly, 2012). Estimates suggest that around USD 90 billion is required to close Africas infrastructure gap annually until 2020 (AICD, 2010).