Macroeconomic Report & Economic Updates

October 17, 2016

Nigeria Economic Update (Issue 43)

The IMF World Economic Outlook report, indicates a downward revision for Nigerias 2017 economic growth. Specifically, growth has been projected to expand by 0.6 percent relative to the 1.1 percent earlier projected. The decrease is attributable to sharp growth slowdown experienced in Nigeria, occasioned by prevailing constraining factors (crude oil production disruptions, Forex and power shortages, and weak investor confidence). The outlook, which does not seem optimistic, reveals Nigerias further vulnerability to potential external and internal risks/shocks.

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Nigeria Economic Update (Issue 8)

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