Macroeconomic Report & Economic Updates

September 4, 2018

Nigeria Economic Update (Issue 34)

Total capital imported into Nigeria declined in 2018Q2, compared to 2018Q1 – the first quarterly decline since 2017Q1. At $5.5 billion in 2018Q21, capital importation dropped by 12.5 percent from the $6.3 billion recorded in the preceding quarter. The quarter-over-quarter decline may be attributable to decreases in both portfolio and other investments, which fell by […]

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Total capital imported into Nigeria declined in 2018Q2, compared to 2018Q1 – the first quarterly decline since 2017Q1. At $5.5 billion in 2018Q21, capital importation dropped by 12.5 percent from the $6.3 billion recorded in the preceding quarter. The quarter-over-quarter decline may be attributable to decreases in both portfolio and other investments, which fell by 9.8 percent and 24.1 percent respectively. However, portfolio investment maintained its leading role in contributing to total capital importation, at $4.1 billion or 74.5 percent. On the flip side, FDI continues to be the least contributor since 2017Q1, and accounted for only 4.7 percent ($264.1 million) in the review quarter. The overall lower capital inflows, particularly portfolio investments, puts into perspective the recent persistent downward trend in Nigeria’s capital and money markets.




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Nigeria Economic Update (Issue 43)

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