Macroeconomic Report & Economic Updates

September 3, 2018

Nigeria Economic Update (Issue 32)

Nigeria’s infrastructure stock, comprising of roads, water-ways, seaports, airports, etc, increased slightly albeit a slower pace in recent years. At an estimated 35 percent of GDP in 2018, infrastructure stock grew marginally from the recorded 20-25 percent in 20141. The increase may be premised on slightly improved capital spending (the Federal government budgetary capital spending […]

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Nigeria’s infrastructure stock, comprising of roads, water-ways, seaports, airports, etc, increased slightly albeit a slower pace in recent years. At an estimated 35 percent of GDP in 2018, infrastructure stock grew marginally from the recorded 20-25 percent in 20141. The increase may be premised on slightly improved capital spending (the Federal government budgetary capital spending increased from N691 billion in 2015 to N2.2 trillion in 2017) for the four years under review. However, Nigeria’s infrastructure stock continues to be significantly lower than the recommended international benchmark of 70 percent- a point it hopes to reach by 2043 if the required annual $100 billion is invested over the next three decades.




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Climate Policy And Finance

Carbon pricing has been recognized not only as the most efficient economic policy instruments to internalize the social cost of emissions, but also as a major tool to generate public revenues that can be used to offset the potential adverse distributional effects of climate policy. However, in many developing countries, there is a widespread reluctance to commit to climate policy, largely due to financial constraints, a lack of public support, and concern over its regressive effects.This paper makes recommendations towards the design of an effective carbon pricing system that not only discourages air pollution but also encourages the gradual uptake of climate-friendly technologies by the private sector in Nigerias oil and gas sector, while supporting public investment in sustainable infrastructures and projects that offset the distributional effect of the climate policy.

Nigeria Economic Update (Issue 30)

Power sector analysis shows an increase in power generated by 3.01 percent from 2903.5mw to 2991.8mw between July 1, 2016 and July 8, 2016, with a peak of 3260.8mw on July 5, 2016. This is however, still below the highest (5074.7mw) recorded in February, 2016. The increase reflects improved use of hydro (water) for power generation. The easing out of gas constraint occasioned by recent pipeline repairs have also contributed to the increase in power generation. Improvements in power generation would be sustained if hydro measures are complemented with fast-tracked repairs on damaged gas channels and intensified efforts at tackling pipeline sabotage.