Macroeconomic Report & Economic Updates

July 23, 2018

Nigeria Economic Update (Issue 24)

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Agricultural sector exports increased at a remarkable pace in 2017. Total earnings from agricultural export goods grew by 181 percent to N170.4 billion1, compared to the N60.7 billion earned in 2016. The remarkable improvements in exports and export earnings reflect improvements in agricultural production and supply, at the backdrop of the provision of farm mechanization services2 and a likely boost in harvest periods during the year under review




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Nigeria Economic Update (Issue 46)

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Nigeria Economic Update (Issue 45)

Recently released report by Nigeria Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative (NEITI)shows a significant decline in revenue allocation across the three tiers of government for 2016H1 (January to June). Specifically, total disbursements dropped (year-on-year) by 30.45 percent to N2.01 trillion in 2016H1. The drop in revenue allocations is accountable to the decline in both oil and non-oil revenue. While lower oil revenue was triggered by the drastic fall in oil price and production in 2016H1, lower non-oil revenue was driven by the decline in tax revenue occasioned by contraction in economic activities in the review half-year.

Nigeria Economic Update (Issue 49)

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