Macroeconomic Report & Economic Updates

June 27, 2018

Nigeria Economic Update (Issue 22)

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Recently released demographic figures by the NBS shows an upward progression in population and its composition. Specifically, Nigeria’s population reached 193 million in 2016, growing at an annual average of 3.25 percent1. Going by the demographic characteristics, the population pyramid reveals that over 41 percent of the population lies between ages 0-14 – a composition of children and adolescents. This implies that fertility rate has been high, as such, a corresponding high dependency ratio. The growing share of this population age imposes supply pressure on available infrastructural amenities; from education to health systems. Similarly, the growing youth population (16-30 years) exerts pressure on the labor market, given their working-class ages




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Nigeria Economic Update (Issue 10)

Nigerias inflation rate remained above CBNs bandwidth of 6-9 per cent. Specifically, the inflation rate increased slightly from 9.55 percent in December 2015 to 9.62 percent in January 20165. The Core sub-index remains the main driver of inflation in Nigeria. The higher prices of items in the Core sub-index such as clothing and foot wears are reflective of higher domestic production costs as a result of the decline in the value of the naira relative to the dollar. However, in the period, the price increase was moderated by the stable price of Premium Motor Spirit (PMS). Going forward, without any sustainable policy measure to prevent the further depreciation of the naira, inflation may exceed the current single digit inflation rate in the near term.

Africa Economic Update (Issue 8)

Economic growth in Africas largest economies improved in the second quarter of 2017 (2017Q2) relative to the preceding quarter (2017 Q1), as Nigeria and South Africa exited recession. Specifically, GDP growth rate was 0.55 percent and 1.1 percent for Nigeria and South Africa in 2017Q2, compared to 0.91 percent and 0.7 percent in 2017Q2, respectively. The increased growth in Nigerias economy was driven by improved performance in the oil sector (increased crude oil price and production) which offset the decrease in non-oil sector growth, while South Africas emergence from recession is supported by growth in its agriculture sector complimented by growth in finance, real estate, business service, mining and quarrying sectors.