Macroeconomic Report & Economic Updates

June 14, 2018

Nigeria Economic Update (Issue 19)

Capital imported into Nigeria, maintained an upward trajectory in 2018Q1, following three consecutive quarterly increase. Specifically, capital importation rose to $6.30 billion in 2018Q11– a remarkable Year-on-Year growth of 594 percent (from $908.27 million), and Quarter-over-Quarter increase of 17 percent ($5.38 billion). Inferably, investors’ interest and confidence in the Nigerian economy have continued to soar […]

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Capital imported into Nigeria, maintained an upward trajectory in 2018Q1, following three consecutive quarterly increase. Specifically, capital importation rose to $6.30 billion in 2018Q11– a remarkable Year-on-Year growth of 594 percent (from $908.27 million), and Quarter-over-Quarter increase of 17 percent ($5.38 billion). Inferably, investors’ interest and confidence in the Nigerian economy have continued to soar since 2017Q2; this is particularly represented by the extent of portfolio investment flows which increased approximately fifteen times more than the $313.61 million recorded in the corresponding 2017Q1 quarter, and accounted for 72.4 percent of total capital importation in the review quarter




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Infrastructure Financing In Nigeria:

Similar to most sub-Saharan African (SSA) countries, Nigeria has a huge infrastructure deficit which considerably limits efforts towards achieving inclusive growth, sustainable development, and poverty reduction. With infrastructure stock estimated at 20-25 per cent of Gross Domestic Product (GDP), Nigerias infrastructure stock is still significantly lower than the recommended international benchmark of 70 per cent of GDP. The 2014 National Integrated Infrastructure Master Plan (NIMP) estimates that a total of US$ 3 trillion of investments, or US$100 billion annually, is required over the next 30 years to bridge Nigerias infrastructure gap. In particular, the Plan estimates that Nigeria will have to spend an annual average of US$ 33 billion infrastructure investments for the period 2014 -2018. This means that Nigeria will have to more than double its spending on infrastructure from the current 2-3 per cent of GDP to around 7 per cent to make appreciable progress in infrastructure development over the next three decades.