Macroeconomic Report & Economic Updates

May 3, 2016

Nigeria Economic Update (Issue 18)

Inflation
rate continued its upward trajectory in the week under review. Specifically,
the Consumer Price Index (CPI) increased by 1.39 per cent, from 11.38 per cent
in February to 12.77 per cent in March, 20161. Remarkably, this is the
highest rate since July 2012, representing a 4-year high. While both components
of the CPI rose in the period, the food sub-index was largely the main driver
of the increase in the CPI, with a growth rate of 1.39 per cent between
February and March. The persistent scarcity in petroleum products, especially
Premium Motor Spirit (PMS), has increased transportation costs and the price of
food items.

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Nigeria Economic Update (Issue 43)

The IMF World Economic Outlook report, indicates a downward revision for Nigerias 2017 economic growth. Specifically, growth has been projected to expand by 0.6 percent relative to the 1.1 percent earlier projected. The decrease is attributable to sharp growth slowdown experienced in Nigeria, occasioned by prevailing constraining factors (crude oil production disruptions, Forex and power shortages, and weak investor confidence). The outlook, which does not seem optimistic, reveals Nigerias further vulnerability to potential external and internal risks/shocks.

Nigeria Economic Update (Issue 39)

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Nigeria Economic Update (Issue 12)

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