Macroeconomic Report & Economic Updates

April 28, 2016

Nigeria Economic Update (Issue 17)

Power sector analysis shows a decline
in power generated by 8.5 percent from a peak of 3,675 mw to 3,362 mw between
April 3, 2016 and April 10, 20169. This record is however still
below 5,074.7 mw- the highest peak ever attained in the country. The declining
power supply which has been attributed to vandalism of pipelines and gas
shortages, has continued to distort economic activities in the country. With
the persistent fall in electricity generation, the possibility of attaining the
targeted 10,000 mw by 201910 seems unattainable. A clear strategy towards
increasing power generation and curbing vandalism is urgently needed.

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