Macroeconomic Report & Economic Updates

March 8, 2018

Nigeria Economic Update (Issue 14)

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Nigeria’s Apex bank held the first meeting of its reconstituted Monetary Policy Committee (MPC) for the year 2018. Following a detailed review of domestic macroeconomic events, the MPC deemed it fit to retain all rates: MPR at 14% (which has remained at a record high of 14 percent since July 2016), CRR 22.5%, Liquidity Ratio 30% and Asymmetric corridor at +200 and -500 basis points around the MPR1. The unchanged monetary policy can be attributed to the MPC’s satisfaction with the continued moderation in economic indices as well as the gradual return to macroeconomic stability. Going forward, fiscal policy authorities should consolidate these positive outcomes given monetary policy inaction.




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Understanding The Ongoing Recession In Nigeria:A Synthesis Of The Events And Policy Options

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