Macroeconomic Report & Economic Updates

March 9, 2018

Nigeria Economic Update (Issue 12)

Download Label
March 13, 2018 - 4:00 am
application/pdf
906.28 kB
v.1.7 (stable)
Read →

According to data released by the National Bureau of Statistics, states generated about N931.2 billion altogether in 2017 fiscal year1, representing 12 percent above the N831.2 billion generated in 2016. Further breakdown shows that 31 states recorded increases, while only about 5 states recorded slight declines in revenue generated internally; Lagos state generated 36 percent of total internally generated revenue (IGR). Notably, with a net FAAC allocation of N1.7 trillion, total revenue available to states stood at approximately N2.7 trillion in 2017. However, the states are still burdened with debts, given the N3.2 trillion and $4.1 billion owed as domestic and foreign debts respectively as at the end of December 2017. Going forward, improvements in tax collection and administrative capacities of revenue-generating agencies of other states, beyond Lagos, can further improve overall IGR.




Related

 

Export And Its Components

Export and its Components: In 2015 and 2016Q1, overall export earnings declined significantly to a record low of less than $3000 million in 2016Q1, as against the peak of above $10,000 million in 2008

Should Nigeria Establish A Sovereign Wealth Fund?

This paper explores the issues relating to the establishment of a Sovereign WealthFund (SWF) in Nigeria consistent with best practices. Experience with established SWFssuggests that successful oil- based funds tend to be underpinned by a sound oil revenuemanagement framework. The paper thus discusses the underlying issues of oil revenuemanagement, the policy choices and SWF implementation issues.

Job Creation In Nigeria: Challenges, Opportunities And The Role Of Micro, Small And Medium Enterpris

This paper identifies the challenges of job creation in Nigeria and examines governments approach using the Micro, Small and Medium Enterprises to support Economic reforms.

Infrastructure Financing In Nigeria:

Similar to most sub-Saharan African (SSA) countries, Nigeria has a huge infrastructure deficit which considerably limits efforts towards achieving inclusive growth, sustainable development, and poverty reduction. With infrastructure stock estimated at 20-25 per cent of Gross Domestic Product (GDP), Nigerias infrastructure stock is still significantly lower than the recommended international benchmark of 70 per cent of GDP. The 2014 National Integrated Infrastructure Master Plan (NIMP) estimates that a total of US$ 3 trillion of investments, or US$100 billion annually, is required over the next 30 years to bridge Nigerias infrastructure gap. In particular, the Plan estimates that Nigeria will have to spend an annual average of US$ 33 billion infrastructure investments for the period 2014 -2018. This means that Nigeria will have to more than double its spending on infrastructure from the current 2-3 per cent of GDP to around 7 per cent to make appreciable progress in infrastructure development over the next three decades.