Macroeconomic Report & Economic Updates

March 9, 2018

Nigeria Economic Update (Issue 11)

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Nigeria’s debt profile reached unprecedented high levels at the end of the year 2017. Figures obtained from the debt management office reveals that debt stock increased Year-on-Year by a significant 42.6 percent and Quarter-over-Quarter by 6.6 percent to N21.73 trillion as at December 20171. Domestic and foreign components of the debt profile grew to N3.35 trillion and N18.38 trillion respectively. The increased debt profile may have been triggered by domestic and foreign borrowings to fund Nigeria’s budget deficit, and excessive debt servicing costs – Nigeria serviced domestic debts to the tune of N1.48 trillion in 20172, about 29.13 percent of its total budget revenue. Implicatively, Nigeria’s debt to GDP ratio continues to increase, from 18.6 percent in 2016 to 21 percent




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Appropriation Act (Budget)

Appropriation Act (Budget): Capital expenditure remarkably increased in 2016 relative to preceding year, on the account of the present governments renewed commitment to infrastructure development.

Nigeria Economic Update (Issue 51)

Recently released data by the National Bureau of Statistics (NBS) shows that there was significant increase in Nigerias total merchandise trade for 2016Q3. Basically, the total merchandise trade increased (quarter-on-quarter) by 16.29 percent to N4, 722 billion in 2016Q3;owing to 29.1 percent increase in exports and 6.2 percent rise in imports. Oil exports increased by 31 percent to N1, 943 billion, while non-oil exports increased by 20.5 percent to N440 billion. However, on the aggregate, Nigeria recorded yet another trade deficit of N104 billion, indicating continuous higher imports relative to exports. Overall, though there is improvement in the performance of non-oil sector, however, this is insufficient to effectively complement the loss in oil trade sustained since the beginning of oil price crash. This suggests that diversification into non-oil sector may not be able to rescue the economy in the short term. However, while the diversification efforts should be sustained, eliminating hurdles in oil production may be instrumental to higher exports, especially as oil price increase is gaining momentum.