Policy Brief & Alerts

January 20, 2014

Increasing Female School Enrollment In Nigeria: Some Policy Options

This brief examines two policy alternatives which
government can adopt in order to increase the enrollment of girls in the
primary school and also help eliminate gender disparity in Nigerian schools:
Provide free primary education with Stipends or provide free primary education
with Transportation.

Download Label
March 13, 2018 - 4:00 am
application/pdf
202.91 kB
v.1.7 (stable)
Read →

Publication Date:December, 2012

Volume Number:1 Issue 8

Document Size:4 pages


The last two decades have witnessed an outpouring of policies aimed at increasing schoolenrollment in Nigeria, yet problems still persist. Evidence on what works and what does notcan help government design and implement programs that may help solve these remainingproblems. In line with promoting evidence based policymaking, this policy brief presents asummary of simulation study of two (2) policy alternatives, which the federal governmentcan adopt in order to increase enrollment of girls in the primary schools, and by extensioneliminate gender disparity.

The results reveal that providing free primary education for all pupils with stipends for girlssaves government more money relative to its effectiveness than providing free primaryeducation for all pupils with transportation for girls. Therefore, for the Nigerian governmentto increase female school enrollment, reduce illiteracy rate and achieve the MDG Goal 3 ofgender equality, the existing policy of free primary education should be complemented withfree transportation for girls in the high pedestrian traffic urban areas and with free stipendsin the low income rural areas.




Related

 

Nigeria Economic Update (Issue 28)

OPEC weekly basket price increased marginally from $45.09 on June 17, 2016 to $45.95 on June 24, 2016, while Nigerias bonny light increased from $47.61 to $48.90 (with a peak of $49.2 on June 23, 2016)within the same period. The rise in oil price, amidst downward pressures, was likely driven by expectations that the UK would remain in the EU. However, price fell (to $47.61) on June 24, 2016 following the outcome of the UK referendum (on June 23, 2016) to leave the EU. This was driven by concerns over a possible contagion effect of further disintegration on the EU (a major oil consumer) which could drive down oil demand in the longer term. In the medium term, oil prices could face further pressure as a result of rising crude oil output and attenuating production disruptions in Canada and Nigeria. Although, the recent rise in oil prices seem transient, Nigeria can benefit from the marginal rise if disruptions in oil production is quickly resolved

Nigeria Economic Update (Issue 5)

The Naira continued to depreciate in the review week. At the parallel market, naira exchanged for N498/$ on January 27, 2017 and N500/$ on February 3, 2017. Despite the weekly sales of forex to BDCs and the significant improvements in the external reserves, the naira has continued to lose value to other currencies. The pressure on the naira has been triggered by escalating scarcity of forex in the spot market, likely due to forex hoarding. However, in the preceding week, the CBN sold $660 million in forwards contract in an attempt to manage liquidity and stabilize the naira. In the face of growing speculation in the parallel market, the monetary authority should institute mechanisms that would discourage excessive forex hoarding among licensed BDC operators. An initiative that monitors transaction dealings in the parallel market would go a long way in detecting erring BDC operators.

Nigeria Economic Update (Issue 15)

Recent data on Nigerias labour market points to a rise in the rate of unemployment and underemployment in 2015Q4. Specifically, compared to 2015Q3, the rate of unemployment and underemployment rose to 10.4 per cent and 18.7 per cent from 9.9 percent and 17.4 percent respectively. These statistics however masks the true situation of the youth employment in Nigeria. Disaggregated data by age category shows that unemployment and underemployment within the youth age category (15-24) was remarkably higher than the national average, at 19 and 34.5 per cent respectively.

All-Share Index And Market Capitalization

All-Share Index: In 2016Q1, the decline in ASI was driven by declines in Banking, Insurance, Consumer goods, Oil/Gas, Lotus Islamic, Industrial, AseM, Pension and Premium NSE indices. However, the ASI