June 18, 2013

Fuel Subsidy Reform, Social Safety Nets (SSNs) And Pro-poor Growth

The
paper examines the importance of fuel subsidy reforms and how the Nigerian
government can achieve a successful reform. It also examines the link between
safety nets and growth to help facilitate reform and inclusive growth.

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Author:Ebere Uneze

Publication Date: December, 2011

Document Size:26pages


Key Message

A well designed safety net and social program can facilitate subsidy reform, and lead to inclusive growth, if successfully implemented.

Objectives

  • Understand the goals of fuel subsidy reform and the important steps the Nigeria government can take to achieve successful reform
  • Understand the link between Safety nets and growth, and how a well designed safety net program can help facilitate reform and inclusive growth
  • Draw lessons from recent fuel subsidy reforms and suggest way forward




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