Publications

May 3, 2016

Export Commodity Prices And Long-Run Growth Of Primary Commodities-Based African Economies

There
is a link between primary commodity export prices and economic performance.
Many African economies are primary commodities export biased, often in few
primary commodities. Previous studies focus on the impact of commodity prices
on growth in Africa with little attention paid to different primary commodities
and level of diversification in primary commodities export. This study,
investigates the effect of primary commodity prices on the long-run growth of 24
primary commodities-based African economies; by commodity types and level of
diversification in primary commodities exports.

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