June 18, 2013

Enhancing Oil Sector Governance In Nigeria Through Transparency Reforms

The
paper highlights the importance of oil sector transparency in order to support governments push towards structural
reforms and inclusive growth.

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Author:Vanessa Ushie

Publication Date:December, 2011

Document Size:23pages


Why Oil Sector Transparency?

  • Corruption negatively affects growth. Overriding logic of unproductive rent-seeking in Nigerias political economy
  • Transparency reforms needed to shore up the credibility of the oil sector, and enhance productivity and efficiency
  • Greater oil sector transparency will support the governments push towards structural reforms and inclusive growth




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